Life Doesn’t Come Easy…

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean and creators of QuikBots for Microsoft Office. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When they’re not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

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Enter the QuikBots for Word Dimension

Future posting will be unlike past posts. Less words, more showy. With limited interruptions.

Here is the first post that involves the QuikBot for Word’s Open feature. See future postings, usually Tuesdays and Fridays unless stated otherwise on all popular social media sites. If you like, thumb it up! If not, don’t be silent. I can take it. Really.

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean and creators of QuikBots for Microsoft Office. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When they’re not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

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Blast From the Past: Help Finding Bad Numbers in Excel

Bad numbers in ExcelSingle out the bad numbers from the
good ones with Data Validation

You have a column in a spreadsheet staring back at you that happens to have some bad numbers hiding among the good. But spotting all of them is not easy when the column is few pages long. That’s when it’s time to use Excel’s Data Validation.

How it works is, say that a column should only contain numbers equal or less than 100,000 (that’s a good round figure) but you spied a couple that are more than 100,000. It gets your wheels turning, wondering how many more bad eggs are loitering about. Data Validation will single out those smelly things and pencil them red.

There’s one hitch, it will only circle up to 255 invalid numbers. If you still want to try it out, first thing is to select the column you want to check. Once that’s done, under the Data Tab you will click on Data Validation.  A dropdown menu will show again the words Data Validation. By clicking that, a window pops up that will ask for the data type to allow, a minimum and a maximum range of numbers. Like 0 to 100,000. Click OK. Go back to Data Validation again. When the drop down menu appears this time pick Circle Invalid Data .  Then click OK. You will then see circled numbers that don’t fit the criteria.

A good thing to note is if your column has more than 255 invalid cells you will get a error message stating “Your worksheet contains more than 255 invalid cells. Only the first 255 cells will be marked.”  Just click OK if that happens. You can make a note of the last invalid number you see, go back to Data Validation and clear out the first batch of red circles. And then do Data Validation again for the next batch of invalid numbers.

Yes, it’s very convoluted.

Apparently, Microsoft assumes there won’t be a need for more than 255 red circles. Or maybe they were short of red circles. It’s a mystery, really. See below to witness Data Validation in action.

Talking about a mystery, is trying to calculate a bunch of Excel numbers and they just won’t total. What gives? Perhaps those numbers are hiding in a text format. Read more about this common dilemma in post Can’t calculate numbers in Excel?

datavalidation

QuikBots for Excel
QuikBots Update: QuikBots for Word is in beta testing now. We would love to have you as a beta tester! Want to give us your opinion? Click here: QuikBots Beta Test for Word

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

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Repost from September: How to password protect in Excel

Password protect all or part of a Excel spreadsheet

You worked really hard on that Excel spreadsheet. Got the formulas working, the formats just right, but now that it’s complete, time to pass it along. However, fear sets in when anybody can willy nilly make any changes to your hard work, messing up your formulas or removing a vital name with one keystroke.

Dispel that fear by protecting your work with a password. By doing that, people can see your spreadsheet but if they try to change anything, they get a “No You Don’t” or a politer message depending on what Excel version you have. To create a password, go to the Review tab and find and click on Protect Sheet. That will bring up a pop up window which allows you to enter a password. In this window, you enter a password to protect the rest of the sheet under the confusing title Password to unprotect sheet. You will also notice check marks next to Protect worksheet and content of locked cells, as well as Select locked cells, and Select unlocked cell. You can leave them checked. Click OK. You will be asked to re-enter your password. Just make sure they’re the same.

Another situation you might be facing is allowing one section to continuous changes, but for the rest of the spreadsheet it’s protected. So let’s start by heading over to the Review Tab. Then select with your mouse any part of the spreadsheet, say a column, that you don’t mind any sticky fingers to touch. Now go and select Allow Users to Edit Ranges. A pop up window will appear. Click on New where another window comes up named New Range. Since you want changes to occur just click Ok. The Allow Users to Edit Ranges comes back. At the bottom, select the Protect Sheet button. This is the same window mentioned above, where you enter a password to protect the spreadsheet, under the Password to unprotect sheet. You will again notice check marks next to Protect worksheet and content of locked cells, as well as Select locked cells, and Select unlocked cell. Again, click OK. Just like above, you will be asked to re-enter your password.

Oh, one very important thing, don’t forget the password you created, or you won’t be able to make changes either and that would be very bad. Now no harm will come to your hard work. Below are some lovely How-To videos.

Protect the entire sheet:

protectsheet1

Protect a selected area:

protectsheet2

And if you want to make that spreadsheet pop with color, you can check out, Want to add color splash in Excel? It a rainbow of fun.

QuikBots Update: QuikBots for Word is in beta testing now. We would love to have you as a beta tester! Want to give us your opinion? Click here: QuikBots Beta Test for Word

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat.
Find out more at AXbean.com.

Losing your anonymity for fun and profit

The loss of our privacy by our own hands

Selling privacy
Photo courtesy Pat Pllon

NOTE: This is a repost from 2016.

Back in the day we used to have a landline phone (not this one)

And every so often to the point of irritation we would get debt collector’s calls for people who had our phone number before and apparently had created a huge mountain of debt.

We started out politely stating to these callers that they got the wrong number and ask to be removed from the list. They said they would and the calls ceased. For about as long as a cat stayed off the kitchen counter.

The problem is these debt companies would buy a list of names who owed money, go through the list and when they couldn’t wrangle more money, they would sell the list to another debt company and we would start getting calls again. So good riddance to the landline.

Big Data and selling of people’s information can be put in the same barrel as bill collectors that pass along lists down the debtors’ line. But it only works if people are willing to let go of their privacy to get something in return.

Whether it’s good or services, we are willing to give up vital information about ourselves to get a new credit card, free concert tickets, sign up for NetFlix or trying to get certified as a Woman Owned Business (But that is a whole other ranting blog post.) But we all do it.

We have let go of our privacy and hope that when we do, our confidential information is not being sold or worse, falling into dubious hands. Unfortunately, it is on both counts.

So my recommendation is to pay cash for everything and if that’s not possible, is it really worth buying? And get a library card. And if temptation is still too great, a Time Machine will do the trick. Just fill out this here form and it’s yours.

QuikBots Update: QuikBots for Word is in beta testing now. We would love to have you as a beta tester! Want to give us your opinion? Click here: QuikBots Beta Test for Word

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat.
Find out more at AXbean.com.

Repost from October: Fast way to do an Excel footer

Excel Footer

How to easily create a footer or many footers in Excel

This is a sequel of Easy way to put titles in Excel, where you will find instructions about putting titles/headers on the top of Excel pages before they are printed or exported. The only difference is that a Footer goes at the bottom of individual pages.

Applying a Footer is very similar to the instructions for the Header. Now one thing to note about Footers, is it’s not to be confused with footnotes. Footers can only have short descriptions up to 255 characters. So its purpose, as with the header, is to contain information such as page numbers or an author’s name and copy the contents throughout the document.

A footnote, on the other hand (or foot), is a lengthy reference or comment just on one page. And it may have more than 255 characters, which can be a problem in Excel. There are loopholes to getting around this obstacle that takes some extra steps. If any of you need to know how to insert footnotes in Excel, leave a comment below and I’ll write about it in a post.

As I said in the beginning of this post, doing a footer is similar to doing a header,so I’ll just highlight the important parts that should be repeated. For a more detailed explanation please head over to Easy way to put titles in Excel.

QuikBots Now the important thing to remember before starting a Footer is to not have a blank spreadsheet. There must be data like numbers or text in the spreadsheet for the Footer command to work, if not, it will behave badly.

QuikBots To get started, you can go to the Insert tab, then click on Header & Footer, or you can head over to the View Tab a nd click on Page Layout. After doing either one, roll your mouse over to the bottom of the page and click on the words, “Click to add footer.”

QuikBots A new tab will pop up next to View called Design with a subtitle of Header and Footer Tools. Click on that tab.

QuikBots When using some of the features, it will at first show up in the box as & [ ]. When you click outside the box, the correct information will then show up.

QuikBots And if you ever want to change the colors or the font size and styles, all you have to do is double click inside the box and a color and font menu appears.

QuikBots QuikBots Tip: If the font size of your header is so big that it overlaps your first rows, you can use QuikBots Row Insert command to quickly make everything fit.

QuikBots Update: QuikBots for Word is in beta testing now. We would love to have you as a beta tester! Want to give us your opinion? Click here: QuikBots Beta Test for Word

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert are owners of AXbean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

Like this post? Let us know!

Repost from December: When to Create in Excel, paste in Word

create in Excel paste in Word

Why it’s better to create in Excel first rather than Word

If you are an avid Word user, you might be missing out on an easier way to create those documents. To look better and even do a handy cool trick.

No way, you say?

But there is! If you look beyond Word and see Excel’s nerdy smiling face waving its hands frantically. These two were made to work together and there are situations where it’s more beneficial to create a report or spreadsheet first in Excel, then import the information into Word.

Say you’re creating a document in Word where you’re detailing how your company’s website is doing in the Internet world. You pull analytical information from different sources and start typing them up in Word.

Stop right there.

If you like the information nice, neat and more importantly, easier to create, start your typing in Excel. By doing that you avoid all the tab, tab, tab and space, space, space. In Excel, you just enter the data and throw in the headers while you’re at it. Once your done, select the whole work of art and click on Copy in the Home tab.

Now head back into Word and click where you want the Excel info to go. Then it’s time to paste. Now for the cool trick I was mentioning before: On the Paste down arrow there is a Link And Use Destination Styles. It looks like a clipboard with a link in front. Select that and import from Excel is complete.

But wait! There’s one more thing. By picking Link And Use Destination Styles, you have the ability to change something in Excel and it will automatically change in Word. Need to change some numbers without messing up the format? Go into Excel and plug in the numbers and magically those numbers will be in Word. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work in reverse. There is a nifty visual below to enjoy:

QuikBots Update: QuikBots for Word is in beta testing now. We would love to have you as a beta tester! Want to give us your opinion? Click here: QuikBots Beta Test for Word

 

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

Like this post? Let us know!

Having Trouble Importing Excel into Word?

Import Excel list

Repost: Import text from Excel into Word or vice versa hassle free

Whatever the reason, importing, say, a customer list from either Excel into Word or the other way around can often times lead to messy surprises. It’s a pain to clean up a Word list that got ruined when it becomes all jumbled in Excel. The names and addresses were all so perfectly uniform and color coded in Excel only to look like a wave crashing on a beach threw all the letters crawling on the sand gasping for air in Word.

To have a seamless and painless transfer from one program to another, follow these simple instructions:

Let’s first tackle importing a hypothetical Customer List from Word into Excel. Before beginning, there’s a big Hope You Didn’t Do It. For the importing to work hassle free, let’s hope you didn’t use the Space Bar when creating your Customer List in Word. Excel only recognizes Tab key strokes, (such as name (Tab) address (Tab) phone) for spaces. If you did name (Space Bar) address (Space Bar) phone, then imported the file into Excel, it would look like this:

nameaddressphone (a very sticky mess.)

Now for those instructions. Start by selecting all the lines you want to import, then click Copy. After doing that, go into Excel and click the first cell where the Customer List will go. Click on the Paste button. Now the only thing you might have to do manually is resize the columns to fit the text, which if you installed QuikBots, can be done fast. It”s less complicated to import, for instance, a Customer List in Excel into Word. In Excel, just select the customers and hit Copy. Head over to the location in Word where you want the list. Hit the down arrow under the Paste button and select Keep Text Only button on the far right. With QuikBots, select the Customer List, click Copy, go to Word and click Paste. Easy peasy, no teasy.

Sign up for the QuikBots for Word Beta Test now, you won’t regret it. Go to QuikBots for Word.

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert are owners of AXbean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

Like this post? Let us know!

Beta Test for Trust and Clarity

Beta test for trust and clarity

 QuikBots for Word’s Beta Test is an Education in Trust and Clarity

We’re very early in the beta testing of QuikBots for Word and getting valuable feedback. The critical component, which I am still learning, is to take into account human behavior, even before someone starts to beta test new software.

The reasoning behind why and how someone goes through the process of downloading can be in itself a psychological test. Which can make or break a product if ignored.

Barely out the gate with beta testing QFW, we came across two issues. One trust and the other, understanding.

With trust, the issue is with security. We spend countless hours building a reliable brand through our website, having a twice weekly blog and being on social media, in order to convey a sense of trust. So during the beta testing download process, if a security message pops up informing you that there is a potential risk, the idea that we are by no means being malicious is not going to cut through your lingering doubts. I won’t deny that it hurts, but in the end we must remove any suspicion if QFW is going to have any chance of succeeding.

Another painful lesson in the world of beta testing is to be clear and short with download instructions to avoid problems down the road.  Since I am responsible for writing QFW’s download modus operandi,  I have learned from some feedback that our directives have to:

  1. Be very clear,
  2. Have fewer words, and
  3. Strongly emphasize certain key elements.

If not, there will be confusion with a high probability of download mishaps or worse yet, people not bothering to become beta testers. So as the period of beta testing continues, there will be continuous changes to QuikBots For Word’s download to gain trustworthiness, as well as to its beta testing instructions for clarity. To see some of the changes and become a beta tester now, click at this very SPOT.

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AXbean and creators of QuikBots for Microsoft Office. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When they’re not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXbean.com.

Like this post? Let us know!