Mini story on Excel vs Access

Excel is popular but ignoring Access may not be so smart

The more I know about Access, the less I understand why Excel is so popular.

Excel vs Access comparison. Closet
Inside of a cluttered database?

Let’s say you want to add more accessories to your wardrobe, so you’re choosing between two closet organizers: Excel The Expensive and Access The Easy.

Now all of your friends are CRAZY about Excel, though you’re really not sure why, so Mr. Expensive Excel is your first choice.

To make room for the new stuff, Excel wants to take everything out and rearrange the whole closet. Then YOU will have to decide what scarf goes with what outfit, etc. Depending on how big your closet is, you could miss a great combination, and if you’re not careful, a good outfit could get left out. Plus it takes a lot of time, so it costs you more money.

Access The Easy says he will add the new items without redoing the whole closet, and automatically update the related outfits faster and easier. He will save you time and money, and you know nothing is getting stuck in the back behind the sweaters.

RobandDeb

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AxBean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AXBean.com.

Downtown parking using Excel

Using basic Excel to find a downtown parking space

Sacramento Downtown Parking
Sacramento Downtown Parking

Heading to downtown Sacramento to get some lunch. My inner Excel turns on as I enter the rows and columns of numbers and letters. Using my memory of past visits with finding not only the closest parking space, different meter times and the time of day. Being close to the lunch hour, my inner data analyst voice realizes that getting a prime spot is wishful thinking. And with limited time on my hands and since it was lunchtime for everyone on the planet, I calculated a golden parking space a couple blocks away with a one hour meter. Go Excel!

 

AXbean Owners

Debbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AxBean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AxBean.com.

Mr. Bunny Does Data Analysis

Using Mr. Bunny to explain how data analysis works

mr bunny. data analysisGetting myself more familiar with what Access and Excel can do for businesses. I know there will be a time when someone will ask “what’s the deal with information technology and why is it so darn special?” So with my, ahem master art skills, I created  a simple way to explain the world of data analysis. Please enter the magical world of Mr. Bunny. Please note there’s a 10 second lag time between pages. Enjoy!
Click here.

 

AXbean OwnersDebbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AxBean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AxBean.com.

Locating Microsoft Access Design View

I have my design view on you Access, now where are you?

 Design view
Design View in Access

So I noticed that some people in the past were having trouble finding design view in Access. Why? It’s right there, see it? Got me too. Well, after I spent a large amount of my mouse’s battery life trying to find it myself and maybe a little direction from Robert. I see where it was all along, so clearly now. After clicking on the Home tab. Then on the far left under the word  View is a tiny arrow. Click on that. Down comes a menu and that where that little bugger is hiding.On the next installment. Why I went to detective school to learn Access.

 

AXbean OwnersDebbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AxBean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AxBean.com.

Simple tips to fill a list fast in Excel

Two simple tips to do dates or just first names in a spreadsheet

Dipping my toes into the Excel pool, I never knew there were so many tips to be repetitious. I first came across autofill or what I think it should be called, seqfill, when Robert told me about how it saves time doing sequential numbers like dates down a row of columns.
tips to Excel's autofill
Excel’s Autofill
Typing manually Monday, Tuesday and so on is a tenuous endeavor that could make one’s brain go numb. Just type the date say, Monday in the first cell or box and here’s the fun part, there’s a microscopic green square in the bottom right hand corner of said box. Didn’t know it was there, did you? Me neither. So, you put your mouse on it, hold and drag down. No more staying late. Yay!

Then another revelation or Tip 2

Then sometime later when I was playing around with a free trial of Office 2016, came across flashfill, or copyfill. It does the same thing as autofill but with text or numbers but with a twist.
Tips to Excel's Flashfill
Excel’s Flashfill
Say you have a row of full names and you want a row of just first names next to the full names. Type the first name in the box. Go to the Data tab or data menu. There is a flash fill button, click it and voila, it does the rest.
Time for some jellybeans.

In my next installment, Why do I have to keep coming up with better jargon than Microsoft? Pivot table? Seriously? What is that?

Robert and Debbie Wallis, founders of AXbeanDebbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AxBean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AxBean.com.

Introducing AXbean DeBlog

Well, I’ll do my best to entertain you

This is my very first post here which I named DeBlog. And I assume the first order of this here blogging is to introduce myself. I’m Debbie Wallis and I’m co-owner of AxBean with my husband Robert. We are proprietors of providing Microsoft Access and Excel (AX) consulting, training, and helping the inundated through the twists and turns of two of the most well known but at times frustrating software programs that Microsoft has unleashed into the business world.

You are probably wondering “oh boy, more experts in an already crowded field.” Well, you are so wrong. Just one expert in an already crowded field, for now. That’s Robert. I, on the other hand, know next to nothing about AX. And on top of that I’m pretty new with this running a business thing too.

So here is what I am hoping for with my upcoming posts that will entice you to keep coming back is to expose my struggles, fears and computer tantrums with some progressive wisdom of intertwining my on the job training of AX and also running a business.

There will probably be some fumbling, bruises, and second guessing experiences but what’s really important here is, in the end you will have the benefit of being in the front row seats.

So make some popcorn, I’ll wait til you get back.

Robert and Debbie Wallis, founders of AXbeanDebbie Wallis and her husband Robert, are owners of AxBean, a guiding light to all things Microsoft Access and Excel. They reside in the central valley area of Sacramento, California between agriculture and government central. When not working, you can see them running about outside, exploring shops, chowing down at all kinds of eateries and whenever possible, being more curious than a cat. Find out more at AxBean.com.